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9/7/14

White Heat


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I've generally stayed faithful to the so-called 'fashion rules' that society dictate. Avoid too many competing prints, wear black to look slim, and stay away from unflattering drop-crotch pants at all costs. But everyone needs to rebel at some point or another. Whoever made up the rule of 'No white after Labor Day' obviously did not know the struggles of living with a monochromatic closet. It's way past September 1st, and I'm officially a rule breaker.

This summer, I've grown to love little white dresses as a viable alternative to the classic LBD. White has the ability to bring a certain freshness to any formal occasion - think Gwyneth Paltrow's Calvin Klein cape dress at the Oscars. Now that summer is over, there are still ways to wear white without utterly offending the posh American society ladies in the late 1800s who imposed the Labor Day rule. In lieu of summery fabrics such as linen, experiment with winter textures in white. For their Fall/Winter 2014 collection, Nicole and Michael Colovos of Helmut Lang worked the shade in a variety of thick textiles from knits to fluffy mohair, resulting in light yet cosy looks. This cocktail number from Zara has contrasting pleather panels that give it a luxe finish, making for a great day to night look. Having paired it with a bright red lip and copper hardware, I feel ready to take on Diddy's infamous Fourth of July white parties. Maybe next year.


ZARA WHITE PLEATHER DRESS
ZARA WHITE LEATHER WEDGES
COS COPPER RING
DIY PERSPEX EARRINGS

8/7/14

Loose Comforts


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Summer in the city. A time when the temperature rises to the thirties, a sheen of sweat perpetually clings to your face and sane people hop from air-conditioned mall to air-conditioned mall in search of cool relief. Or if you're an insane fashion blogger like me, time to sneak onto a roof at the height of noon and take some snaps.

I've learnt the hard way (ie. by wearing spray-on jeans) that skin tight clothing is not the best option to survive the summer. This season, many designers have been leaning toward looser cuts, favoring bermuda shorts over bodycon dresses. Alexander Wang showcased casually unbuttoned dress shirts in his SS14 collection, whilst relaxed trousers and draped kimono jackets were seen at Helmut Lang. Evidently, there seems to be the consensus that slouchiness is acceptable in the heat. With this in mind, I descended down the slippery slope of comfortable dressing today with a Zara split top and loose fitting Mango trousers, hoping to catch the breeze 20 storeys up from steaming Causeway Bay. Praying that I can keep comfort fashionable and not enter the IDGAF stage of living in sweats and binge-eating ice cream. That might just send me over the edge.
ZARA SPLIT TOP
MANGO TROUSERS
ZARA WEDGE HEELS
JIL SANDER LEATHER BACKPACK
COS FOLDED EARRINGS
COS SQUARE RING
CHEAP MONDAY BAR RING

PHOTOS BY NICK CHAN

6/19/14

Fresh Face


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Let's be honest here: we all judge a book by it's cover. It comes in many forms: from eating macarons for their cute colors to swiping right to that guy on Tinder purely because of his sexy ab shots (guilty!). The truth is that many of our decisions in life are undeniably based on appearance. That holds particularly true for the act of cosmetics shopping. I can't tell you how many times I've stared lustily at the gorgeously packaged (yet extortionately priced) face products at Aesop, or envied the women who came out of Chanel Beauty carrying a bottle of signature perfume, whether it be No. 5 or Noir.

With my obsession with minimal packaging, I initially found it difficult to purchase simply packaged cosmetics in Hong Kong, with its taste tending towards girly Japanese/Korean makeup. It seems like the inverse law is at work in the beauty world - the lesser the embellishments, the steeper the price. However, I got lucky with the Japanese brand Muji, famous for their simple homeware and gel pens that Asian teenagers fawn over. Muji also produces great makeup and skincare line. With a price point comparable to drugstore products, it surprised me with its quality (and beautiful packaging of course). That their products are relatively fragrance-free is also a plus.

Of all the products I purchased in my skincare shopping binge, the best was the face soap, which generated a rich lather, and the toning water, which did a great job of removing excess dirt from the skin. Whilst the moisturizing cream was a little too thick, the face scrub could have had a denser and rougher consistency with greater exfoliating power. All in all, they were decent products worth the affordable price. I'm hoping that they'll be successful in alleviating my teenage breakouts that have persisted way too late into my teenage years for my taste, despite many different products over the years. Maybe less really is more.


MUJI FACE PRODUCTS

(FROM LEFT)
FACE SOAP
FACE SCRUB
HIGH MOISTURE LIGHT TONING WATER
EYE MAKEUP REMOVER
SPF 50 SUNSCREEN
MOISTURIZING CREAM 

AVAILABLE AT MUJI STORES OR ONLINE

6/9/14

Art Basel


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The practice of wandering stylishly around art galleries is ubiquitous in most major cities, save Hong Kong. Despite living in such close proximity to so many galleries, I rarely find the time to step foot into those hushed halls and appreciate their works of art. The same can be said for many Hong Kongers, which is why, sadly, our shopping malls receive exponentially more attention than our art.

However, there is the occasional exception - Art Basel being one of them.  The renowned art fair brings contemporary work from all over the globe to a single, packed location, creating an  artistic microcosm within three floors of the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Center. Over the past weekend, Hongkongers flocked there to see the works of artists from Jenny Holzer to Takashi Murakami. Pieces ranged from thought-provoking to humorous and absurd, from Lee Wen's photography series depicting the artist covered in yellow paint, an exploration of ethnic identity, to the metallic sculpture of a woman rising from a Snickers bar. The star of the show was perhaps He Xiangyu's hyperrealistic sculpture resembling artist Ai Wei Wei lying on the floor. What may have been more intriguing was the reactions of the visitors that crowded around it quizzically, as if to determine whether the man was indeed a sculpture or a passed out remnant of Friday night out at the Lan Kwai Fong clubs.

Such works were characteristic of the extremities of artistic expression showcased, with the kitsch as well as the minimal (no surprises, my favorite). This creative diversity highlights the democratic nature of art - that there is truly something for everybody.
ART BASEL HONG KONG 2014